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them to bring it back into the united states that the condition that they invest in excellent capital in the united states. we tried to repatriation in 2004 and companies brought back the money and went out to shareholders and there is no actual investments in expansion of capital equipment, so i think having a compromise where you allow companies to repatriate the money coming out of the 35% tax rate, but maybe 10% to 12%, the tie that with actual metrics of expanding the workforce or investment in the united states is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to ac
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
's in the most managerial job in the world. president of the united states, these are the free world is my question was how does he do it? odyssey make decisions? how does a cover? that's interesting too, but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books about to dismiss the serious and sustained weight. >> you see this as a campaign document coming up close to the november election? >> guest: well, publishers do like the time for it when attention. most americans tune into politics around election time. that is more or less a happy accident. >> host: one of the things that surprised me and the surprise a lot of the leaders is all of your sources are democrats. this is a very critical study, get all of your sources were democrats. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of our long-term career and technical people, but for the most part, these are people who work alongside the president and the white house and federal agencies the halls of congress and i got to see him up close. when i discovered much to my surprise is this is an administration that is really
is in the most important managerial job in the world. he is president of the united states leader of the free world and so my question was how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not with the content of the positions are but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books we looked at this question semiserious and sustained way and they really were none. >> host: do you see this as a campaign coming out close to the american election? >> guest: we do know that most americans do into politics around election time but that is more or less -- is the one of the things that surprised me and will surprise a lot of your readers is that you say twice in the book that all of your sources were democrats and this is a very critical study of obama's leadership that all of your sources for the book were democrats. tell us about that position. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of who are longtime career technical people and intelligence services and so on but these are people who work alongside the president in one capacity or another in the wh
that would trade places with the united states of america. our problems can be solved in our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder but it leads to a better place. i am asking you to choose that future. i'm asking you to rally around a set of goals that create new manufacturing jobs here in ohio. that build on what we have already done, to create a new energy strategy for america. building on what we have already done to improve education and break down our -- and turn the page on a decade of war. that is what we can do in the next four years, cincinnati. that is why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] [applause] [chanting] >> now i want everybody to be clear the goals we set our concrete and they are achievable. the first part of the plan is to export more products and outsourced cheaper jobs. after a decade of decline, this country has created a half-million new manufacturing jobs in the last two and half years. a whole lot of them here in ohio. when some of these other folks said we should let detroit go bankru
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
's been lacking. it's embarrassing to me for the nearly years i have been a member of the united states national not to see that leadership exhibited in the united states of america. thank you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, this week my home state of mississippi received the sobering news that our economy had slipped back into recession. frankly, i'm concerned that my state may be a harbinger for the rest of the country. despite national efforts to create new jobs and opportunities, our economy is not getting significantly bett better. it is a problem, we think. in most states unemployment has remained over 8% for more than three years despite spending nearly $1 trillion with the president's 2009 stimulus package. investments in small business growth have languished, and they've done this in a state of the economy, tax policy, federal regulations that seem to have made matters worse. the course we're on is simply not good enough. we hope and we urge the senate to make a strong stand. let's get to
important managerial job in the world. president of the united states leader of the free world. my question was, how does he do a? how does he decide? how does he make incisions? how does the governor? >> the senate is about to return from recess for a series of those. a bill to continue funding the government for six months. a bill sponsored by montana senator, jon tester to ease regulations and was on some outdoor sports, fishing and hunting. and a bill by kentucky senator, randy paul to cut off u.s. aid to pakistan, libya and egypt. this is live coverage of the senate on c-span 2. senate will come to order. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: mr. president seeing the distinguished chairman of the foreign relations committee in the chair, i have a feeling i may be preaching to the converted but let me say that we were -- all of us were outraged by the mob that denigrated the muslim faith -- or by the video that denigrated the muslim faith but then by the mob violence, some of it rep
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
. it is the overtime that jews as a class have been expelled from anywhere in the united states. and around 1982, new information concerning the order had he come available from the association that published ulysses s. grant's papers. and so i began to prepare my remarks i put on the new suit and my talk seemed to be going well until i approached the subject of smuggling. ulysses s. grant was completely concerned about the north and the south. and since some of the smugglers that these troops caught were jews, he concluded that all jews or smugglers. that pointed out that we now know that smuggling was rampant was by no means a jewish monopoly. the continued rants own father, jesse grant was engaged in a clandestine scheme to move southern cotton northway. his partner was a jewish clothing manufacture and send them back. no sterner with those words out of my mouth and began to shift uneasily in the room and the pioneering of the american jewish historian buried his face in his hands. it was out of this world. i said something went terribly wrong. so the archives i didn't know what the problem was. s
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
in the british foreign office in the united states should have the capacity to keep our eye on more than one war upon. >> i suppose the key was to negotiate. it didn't work that way. if it didn't work that way in a western democracy, the do very little chance of the work in that way in afghanistan, therefore the extent to which there is an engagement, whether it's track to her otherwise with the taliban if they think they're important because you can wait a long, long time for the kind of progress in security level, which may never happen. >> you're absolutely right. i keep using that as an example. there was no military plan that has that is the subject to defeating the insurgency. our strategy is not defeating the insurgency. >> affair in which he said among the afghan leadership. >> i think they generally want assessment. they have huge differences on what terms are prepared to accept. if you talk to afghan women, they are very worthy attempts of settlement will be to their detriment. you also talk and they don't want to give up the amount of power they've had. they've had more power than the
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
lived, or james madison, or abraham lincoln, would united states exist? if it did exist would be the same country we know to be? what other people have, thought, fill the shoes and done what they did, or would things be markedly different? for our purposes tonight, the question is if william f. buckley, jr. had not lived, what conservatism be what it is today or would it be different? would have been a conservative movement? had there been a conservative movement, which it had achieved the same success that it has achieved? i'm going to put that question aside for a moment and try to circle back to it later. let's start with who was buckley. well, he had six different careers, or he did things that would have been, would have filled careers for six people and made them whole and quite a few successful. let's start with the fact he was a syndicated columnist. he wrote for many, many, many years. in fact, up until he died, a column called on the right. at its height it was published three times a week in 350 newspapers. he was one of the most widely read columnists in the countr
to be than right here in washington d.c. to do that. well, he joined the united states senate in january of 2011 and he has established himself as a constitutional conservative, pledging to work every day to reform government and as business as usual here in our nation's capital. i'm proud to say he hasn't received a 100% score on the frc action scorecard for the 112th congress, voting to defund obamacare and planned parenthood [applause] he is a devoted father and husband. married to his wife kelly for over 21 years and together they have had the joy of raising three teenage boys, william, duncan and robert. amidst a busy schedule he regulates in volunteers and coaches their baseball and soccer teams. please help me welcome to the stage from the great state of kentucky -- well his dad is from texas. and they both stand for protecting the constitution for which i am extremely grateful. please welcome senators rand paul. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> thank you. can you believe we had trouble getting -- the democrats had trouble getting god into the platform? sounds like there wasn't much dissensi
loans was because his motive was to get more green energy in the united states, right? so what was the motive behind operation and furious? the people i talk to said, look, they knew that gun control was a politically-suicidal issue to take up especially before the 2010 election based on the 1994 election, rahm emanuel at the time was president obama's chief of staff, he is a smart guy. and so you look at the evidence of the e-mails, the internal e-mails, the sources i've talked to, and they say this wasn't an issue of legislating gun dealers out of business, this is an effort to regulate them out of business, and the obama administration has a habit of when they can't get something through congress, they go through regulatory agencies. this falls into that pattern. at the beginning of the obama administration, president obama right out o the gate made gun trafficking and taking on these mexican cartels a top priority. he was in mexico within three months of his inauguration. hillary clinton was there, eric holder was there, and they were all pushing that 90% of guns found in m
.s. debt, as is featured. unbelievable that the debt of the united states could be at risk. but there you have it. it's a big deal. and there is no particular magic wand. the truth is with elected leaders who have been unwilling to tell us we have to pay for what we ask for. so we haven't done it. the debt is now burdening our economy, our growth, our job creation. and, frankly, even our attitudes. it creates a coloration of the whole climate that says, don't take risks. you already own too much. you slow down in that regard, you slow down the ability to solve the problem. that's why we are today. a couple rules. as we begin this conversation to shift from a problem approach to solution approach. first of all, let's try to get our latest essay there are no quick fixes to that, and there are no absolutes, let's stop the exercise of saying i will never, i will never support a tax increase, i will never support a tax on social security or entitlements. all that does is delay the honesty, the ability to work together. we have to do what we have to do to fix the problem that we created. that's
that threatens the very viability of the united states senate. last july the obama administration used the flimsiest of arguments, granted themselves the authority to waive federal welfare work requirements. and whether or not what they, the obama administration intends to accomplish with these waivers is good welfare policy has been the subject of robust debate. i'm not here to argue the merits or lack thereof of the underlying welfare policy goals of the obama administration. what i am here to do is to make a plea to my fellow senators, as senators we simply cannot let this action stand. if we fail to stand together as senators in defense of our constitutional duty to be the ones to draft legislation, we might as well pack up our bags and go home, because we will have opened the door for this administration and future administrations to unilaterally decide they can waive precedent, congressional intent, and actual legislative language as senators have scrupulously debated and compromised on. if we do not stand together as the united states senate, we will be ceding our authority to t
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
a second obama term and how the united states -- thanks. >> brief word on that. iran policy is going to be close to the center of this but let me make a more specific answer with the matter todd raised. missile defense. the obama administration would be interested in finding a way to smooth relations with russia over subsequent stages to european missile defense architecture. i don't know if president obama could just give vladimir putin a veto. i also don't think he is going to feel a hypothetical plan for 2018 developed a couple years ago needs to be seen and set in stone where governor romney because of his strong views towards russia would see it as a way to establish in backing off on the campaign trail even if language about russia and the top geostrategic threat was overstated and not something he chose for the convention speech but made it pretty clear in that speech that he does see the need to stand up to russia and european missile defense is an important case in point. the other thing i will mention is on strategic nuclear arms control. of the three people i have been men
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i first want to say oddly the congress of the united states should stay in sessioning sessie resolve the issue of sequesteration and other issues like the debt limit and the fiscal cliff we face. i'll vote against adjournment tomorrow. i'll say first that i think i differ with a lot of the colleagues and think we are capable of more cuts in the department of defense. i disagree in the mapper they'll be done through sequester, that it's going to fall disproportionally on weapons and equipment that are so vital to our fighting forces, but let me say, first, that i think perspectively, i would like to see cuts. i think the department of defense is far too top heavy. more admirals and ships in the united states navy, and it's that top heavy across the board in the other services as well. i think we ought to look at some of the permanent overseas military bases we have. 79,000 troops still in europe where they are spending our nato allies, spending less than 2% of the economy on defense. we're at 4.2%. south korea, 28,000 troops, we're at 4.7% of defense spend
it, but the headline is, "life expectancy shrinks for less educated whites in the united states." and let me quote -- generally speaking, the trend for life expectancy in the united states and all over the world has been going up. and the goal of a good society and a strong health care system is to see that people live longer, healthier, happier lives. but as a result of the devastating attacks in a variety of ways on the working class of this country over a period of years, over a period of years, not just starting yesterday, this is where we are. let me quote from this article, and i hope people hear this because this is really shocking stuff. and i quote: "the steepest declines in life expectancy are for white women without a high school diploma who lost five years of life between 1990 and 2008." whose life expectancy went down by five years. this is astronomical. and going back to the article it says, "said jay oshanski, a public health professor at the public university of illinois in chicago and the lead investigator on the study published last month in 'health affairs,' "
want to thank senator gillibrand for bringing this moment to the attention of the united states senate and the american people and thank senator rubio, senator durbin for being here. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years since that tragic event in which terrorists had the attention of the world in the olympics at munich. and it's hard to believe over the last 40 years we've experienced so much of the violence from extremists and terrorists, tomorrow we will commemorate the 11th anniversary of the attack on our own country, and we recognize that the only way that we can stand up to this type of extremism is to never forthe get. -- forget and dere-dedicate ourselves to do everything we can to root out extremists, to root out terrorists and to never forget the consequences of their actions. so i want thank senator gillibrand and senator rubio for the resolution that we passed in this congress, to let those who were victimized 40 years ago to know that we won't forget them and we continue to dedicate our efforts to root out this type of hatred, th
there was a bill in the united states senate. and what it would do is extend tax cuts for 98% of the families here in massachusetts and 97% of small businesses. and senator brown voted no. now why did he vote no? because they weren't enough tax breaks for the top 2% and the top 3%. for me this is just an example of whose side you stand on. are you holding out? are you hanging in there for the top 2%? are eager to fight for working people. >> excuse me. with all due respect, you're misrepresenting my record. and the only person in this race he was hurt in the middle class wants to raise taxes as professor warren. she would not have supported president obama's compromise bill that not only kept taxes low for everybody for the last two years, but also take care of an employment benefits. she would not have supported that because the fee increases -- sorry, the fact we didn't tax more a high income earners. so she would've been about taxing one taxpayer middle-class people. this is about 700,000 jobs. i did make those numbers up, but 3.4 trillion are all things you have said. he won another million in
ourselves in the united states come in this area of paradox the come education, economic development, energy policy and transportation and certainly in health care. the challenge before us is not unlike the ropes game and now your school if you've ever done that. they put you on a post with a roper balances over here is another post another rope in your bosses to move from one to the other from the old business model to the new business model. the only way you can do it is going way out here and for a minute let go of this rope in order to grab the new one. you know, it's human nature to claim to the familiar. it's a leap of faith to reach for the possible. so the opportunity here, the leadership challenge is to describe the new business model in such a way that people can see it and embrace it and let go of the old one in order to embrace that and move forward and then move from the current paradigm to anyone. for decades the u.s. health care system is operated on a business model that assumes that the public sector and private employers will unquestionably underrate and medical inflation r
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the west. but khrushchev actually realized th
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
. to some degree that is largely sitting on the united states. so won't imf put more pressure on the state u.s. congress to approve the change in the coming weeks and how confident are you that we're likely to see the completion of this reform before the annual meeting is at dover as the imf has plans? thanks. >> well, it's not just the united states. clearly there are others including energy 20 countries that has not yet ratified the reform that was committed to by the leaders in 2010. so it's not the u.s. issue. everyone focuses on the us because the u.s. has a very sizable quota in the institution and is my largest member, my largest shareholder if you will. but the u.s. is not alone in that camp. i certainly hope that the u.s. authorities at large, including congress, with appreciate how needed u.s. leadership is and how needed the imf role is going forward in order to address not the sort of remote crisis around the world, but the indirect consequences of those remote crisis is around the world, including on the u.s. economy. i think if there's one thing that we are learning from all th
where we find ourselves today in the united states in the imrair of bar docks and education, in economic development, in energy policy, in transportation, and certainly in health care. so the challenge before us is not like the rope scheme in outdoor school. i don't know if you have done it. they put you ten-feet above the ground. you have to move from one post to the old. to the old business model to the new. the only way you can do it, you have to lean out for here far minute. you have to let go of the rope in order to grab the new. it's human nature to cling to the familiar. the fund here, the leadership challenge is to be able to describe that new business model in such a way people can see it, embrace it and let go of the old in order to embrace and move toward. and then move from the current paradigm to the new. for decades, the u.s. health care system has been operate on a business model that assumes that the public sector and private employers are unquestionly underwrite a medical inflation rate throwing off faster than the cpi and the system continue to be finance notwithstandin
, you spoke about they and you criticize third united states in the area for having what you call a reflexive reaction against any palestinian use of the unite it nations. >> guest: on the -- >> utilization of the united nations do you think the united states is standing in at the way of 0 broader peace evident in the middle east. >> guest: i don't say america is standing in the way. what i can say is that it will require a sustained and determined effort by the u.s., working with some of the countries in the region, and partners in europe, to bring about peace in the region. it has not been sustained. in fact i'm not sure i can say there is a peace process today, and i think the u.s. has such a pivotal role to play, and both parties look to the u.s. leadership. there were times when they looked to see if one had gotten very close. i was in sheikh when president clinton was trying to get a solution, working during night, and at that point it seemed very close -- this was 2000, around there. since then we haven't been that close and there hasn't been a real effort to get the partie
million commercials are designed and aired in the united states at a cost of more than $21 billion." >> guest: i'm very impressed by that. i must have been quoting someone else. c-span: there is, i think, a footnote in there. what are your own television habits? >> guest: i once wrote an article called "confessions of a c-span addict." i am a c-span addict, like many people; more people than you might think. i have it on almost all the time. him i'm a david letterman fan. i watch david letterman a lot. him him him him because i have a 10-year-old daughter who is in love with "beverly hills 90210" and i have to stay in touch with the sitcom, i watch "90210" him him him him and sparingly from time to time. public affairs, of course, i him watch as much as i can, and the news. i'm a real news hound. from time to time high culture makes its way onto certain channels that i can get to, like arts & entertainment or old revival movies, and i watch them there. i expect that this latter part him him him of my viewing habits will be increased as i am able to get access to more and more chann
: when you criticize the united states to have a reflexive reaction with utilization of the united nations i they stand eight in the way of the board your peace effort? >> i can say it will require a sustained and determined effort by the u.s. to bring about peace in the region. it has not been sustained to say there is uh peace process today both look to you as leadership when president clinton tried to get the solution but since then we have not been that close. there are people would now begin to wonder if the two state solution is not evaporating on a questionable basis. >> host: to talk about "war and peace" looking back at your career with globally fares is there more war or more piece? >> in terms of forests there are fewer civil wars today man in the past but we have other problems. rehab internationally organized crime and weapons of mass destruction we have health issues end they can fly around the world very quickly. there are fewer wars but many of the problems that we need to do with in addition that do not exist here not totally sure to seven kofi annan thank you for
, when we talk of united nations in this context, who are we talking about? is it the states who take the decisions and give us a mandate, who give us the resources required to carry out the mandate, or sometimes not give us the resources to carry out the mandate. were we are talking about the secretary on the secretary general. because the u.n. is us. your government and mine. sometimes we talk about the u.n. aspect and by doing that, we are giving the governments who are ultimately responsible for action or inaction in some of these ways, an alibi and blaming the secretary and secretary general. one of my predecessors used to say that we often refer to the secretary general as cheap for short. history doesn't stand for the secretary general to be the scapegoat. [laughter] hosni mubarak you are the world scapegoating sheet. >> we have to be careful not to use it as an alibi. really, when we talk of the failures of somalia, rwanda, bosnia, and i tried to explain the unwillingness of government and troops -- we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. in the investigations
$16,000 every second george allen was the united states senator. voted to raise the debt ceiling four times, voted to raise his own salary four times. now he's talking like a conservative, but his record shows he can't have another crack at it because his actions don't match his word. again, i think the right strategy is an aggregated examination of deductions rather than fighting issue-to-issue. you can have the amount or percentage vary by income or how the tax code is already. that's the most likely path to lead to success. >> we're out of time on that answer. >> can i have time to rebut? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll use the first part to rebut comments tim made. tim talked about $16,000 of debt. now it's the spendin
not be president of the united states without the new leviathan behind him. barack obama came out of columbia, and the first job he had, his first community organizing job which is just another name for being a radical, um, was with the gamaleal foundation. sounds religious, actually. it's religious in the way that jim wallace is religious or jesse jackson or jeremiah wright. it's a radical organization whose goal was to get lots of government money into, into poverty areas. i'm going to come back to getting money into poverty areas, if i remember, in a bit. but that's where he started. and he was picked up, well, because he already as in college, already in high school he was a radical. so he was also picked up by the midwest academy. and these are funded by macarthur and ford and rockefeller and joyce and so forth. the midwest academy is run by two '60s radicals or by heather booth in particular. her husband, paul booth, is an executive with the municipal employees' union, so you have -- this is where the alliance between the government unions, government union thugs and they're very radica
the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we say the national anthem. which was quickly disproved just by looking at youtube, people around the world going like this when they sang the national anthem. he dropped that the very next day. i don't think he ever said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that's an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely in small increments. >> and i think the other thing, we're talking before the panel with brendan about this, i think the other thing we don't know was how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making as, with speechwriters come as they are talking about wording? and how often are they sang well, if we say that the fact checkers will get us. now, i suspect that's happening a lot. but the only evidence i have had of it as a column written by connie schultz who is married to jerry brown, who said that conversation happened in the brown campaign. i suspect it is happening in many campaigns, and i think that th
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